The Principles of a Safe Secure & Intelligent (S2I) Communications System

And that’s it. That is the entire basis for developing these principles, the rules of the road, these guiding lights, so that we can protect these systems we so dearly rely on.

What is a principle? The “know all” (aka, Google) tells us a principle is: “a fundamental truth or proposition that serves as the foundation for a system of belief or behavior or for a chain of reasoning.”

What is a communication system? The other “know all” (aka, Wikipedia) tells us a communication system is: “In telecommunication, a communications system is a collection of individual communications networks, transmission systems, relay stations, tributary stations, and data terminal equipment usually capable of interconnection and interoperation to form an integrated whole.” Continue reading “The Principles of a Safe Secure & Intelligent (S2I) Communications System”

Local LinkedIn pick as cybersecurity guru talks trends

I think government is traditionally been way behind on procurement issues and recently, enactment of legislation for modernization has taken place. They’re trying to replace a lot of legacy systems.

Our guest today was recently named by LinkedIn as one of the top five people to follow in cybersecurity issues among their 500 million members. He was also just selected as LinkedIn to be an advisor on cybersecurity and emerging technology issues, and we’re lucky enough to have him here in the studio– Chuck Brooks of Chuck Brooks Consulting. Chuck, thanks for joining us. Continue reading “Local LinkedIn pick as cybersecurity guru talks trends”

Where the CISO Should Sit on the Security Org Chart and Why It Matters

To ensure that the CISO is so empowered, top leadership must view and treat security as a strategic element of the business. In other words, they must view cyber risks as strategic risks. Internal collaboration with the security function should be supported and strongly encouraged at all levels of the organization.

In early 2016, boards were starting to take cybersecurity more seriously and, in the process, increasing their interactions with chief information security officers (CISOs). How much has changed in the past two years? To whom do CISOs report today, and why does it matter?

The State of the Security Org Chart in 2018

In the latest edition of its “Global State of Information Security Survey,” PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC) found that 40 percent of CISOs, chief security officers (CSOs) or other equivalent information security executives report to CEOs, while 27 percent report to board directors, 24 percent report to a chief information officers (CIO), 17 percent report to a CSO and 15 percent report to a chief privacy officer (CPO). Since PwC’s numbers add up to more than 100 percent and the actual survey questions aren’t provided, these numbers likely include dotted lines of reporting in addition to direct reports. Continue reading at SecurityIntelligence.com

Five New Year’s Resolutions to Help CISOs Improve Enterprise Security in 2018

As we turn the page to 2018, organizations and their CISOs should commit to improving the way they consider, manage, communicate and respond to cybersecurity issues. That means introducing cognitive technology into the security environment, educating top leadership about cyber risks, promoting a culture of security awareness throughout all levels of the organization, conducting data breach simulations and tabletop exercises to hone incident response capabilities, and measuring the progress and maturity of security activities.

If you survived 2017 — a year full of data breaches, ransomware, distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks and a multitude of other high-profile security incidents — you deserve a pat on the back. Some of us weathered the storm thanks to our careful preparations, the security controls we deployed, the incident response strategies we practiced and the recovery mechanisms we put in place. The rest of us can thank our lucky stars that things didn’t turn out for the worse.

Five Enterprise Security Resolutions for 2018

No matter how you navigated the treacherous threat landscape during the past year, it’s time for all of us in information security to make our New Year’s resolutions. If you’d rather not leave the fate of your organization to luck in 2018, here are five resolutions for chief information security officers (CISOs) to apply in the new year. Continue reading at SecurityIntelligence.com

Long Road Ahead or Unbridgeable Chasm? Lessons From the EY ‘Global Information Security Survey’

In many organizations, the executives need to increase the frequency and quality of interactions with the CISO and adopt a more hands-on approach to improving the way cyber risks are managed and governed. In companies where the cybersecurity function still reports to IT, dotted lines of reporting should be created to ensure direct access to top leadership.

If it appears to you that 2017 was a dismal year for cybersecurity, join the club: According to the latest edition of EY’s “Global Information Security Survey,” most security leaders feel they are more at risk today than they were 12 months ago.

The report surveyed chief information officers (CIOs), chief information security officers (CISOs) and other executives from 1,200 organizations around the world. More than 50 percent of survey responses came from small and midsized organizations with fewer than 2,000 employees. Although the top five sectors by respondents were banking and capital markets, consumer products and retail, government, insurance, and technology, other sectors, such as health, power and utilities, and real estate, were also included.

The report shed light on the state of cybersecurity and resilience, which is especially relevant since the global cost of cybersecurity breaches is estimated to reach $6 trillion by 2021. Cyberattacks are becoming more sophisticated, and new and disruptive technologies such as the Internet of Things (IoT) are rapidly increasing the level of connectedness across organizations, thus increasing the attack surface. Continue reading at SecurityIntelligence.com

Emerging Technologies and the Cyber Threat Landscape

Nothing is completely un-hackable, but there is a myriad of emerging technologies that can help us navigate the increasingly malicious cyber threat landscape.

Cybersecurity is at a tipping point, the sheer volume of breaches, attacks, and threats has become overwhelming.  Juniper Research, suggests that the rapid digitization of consumers’ lives and enterprise records will increase the cost of data breaches to $2.1 trillion globally by 2019. About 1.9 billion data records got exposed in the 918 data breaches that occurred in the first half of 2017—up 164 percent from the last half of 2016. According to a recent AT&T Cybersecurity Insights report, some 80 percent of the IT and security executives surveyed said their organizations came under attack during the previous 12 months.

This rising threat trend, coupled with the rapid growth of sophistication in malware, ransomware, DDoS, and social engineering attacks has created a conundrum. How do we protect ourselves in an increasingly connected world? Continue reading “Emerging Technologies and the Cyber Threat Landscape”

2018 & Beyond – Cybersecurity’s Future

Market forces are at play here, and with a global market, it’s tough to control what gets built, to what specifications, and then find an appropriate way to share that information with potential buyers.

Perspectives From 3 Of The Top SMEs In Information Security

As we approach the new year, I, Chuck Brooks, am very pleased to have a discussion with four of the most prominent technical SMEs in the world of cybersecurity; Kenneth Holley, George Platsis,  and Christophe Veltsos.  Their answers that follow offer practitioner perspectives and advice on some of the key issues and technologies that encompass the future of information security. It is worthwhile keeping their comments as a source reference for the C-Suite and anyone concerned about protecting their identities and data. Continue reading “2018 & Beyond – Cybersecurity’s Future”

60 Cybersecurity Predictions For 2018

And one from the #CyberAvengers all on Forbes

Attacks on the US government and critical infrastructure

A nation-state sponsored group will commence a 5-day long DDoS attack against a critical US government (non-DoD) agency, shutting it down in order to show their strength—The Cyber Avengers

Read the entire list on Forbes

Potentially Unwanted Leaks: Social Engineering, Small Missteps, and Big Mistakes

Therefore, you are faced with a situation where you not only have to protect your information but also ensure a third-party is protecting your information. By no means is this an easy task. And if you cannot do that, you need to ensure that you are equipped with the necessary tools to protect against what we’ve been calling “potentially unwanted leaks” (PUL).

In our previous article, we laid the groundwork for what we believe to be a serious threat to ICS/SCADA devices: social engineering. We continue here with some definitions, some of which you may already know. 

Phishing

Phishing is a relatively broad term for any attempt to trick victims into sharing sensitive information, such as passwords, usernames and credit card details. The intent is almost always malicious. Another characteristic of phishing is that it tends to be random, usually exploratory in nature, as opposed to a targeted act. Instead of targeting a specific individual or group of individuals, phishing tends to target multiple victims from within the same organization. Think of phishing as the “throwing spaghetti on the wall and whatever sticks” approach. Continue reading “Potentially Unwanted Leaks: Social Engineering, Small Missteps, and Big Mistakes”

A National Cybersecurity Action Plan is a Serious Priority

We cannot allow this slow economic bleed of our economy to continue. It slows down and even reverses living standards. We simply cannot invest billions into research and development and have it siphoned from us with a few clicks. There is no justifiable reason to let this happen anymore. Smart and competent people have been sounding the alarm bells for some time, but they need more voices to back them.

Expectedly, our cybersecurity issues are growing.  We say expectedly for a variety of factors including, but not limited to: size and scope of breaches, increasing costs that cannot be accurately estimated or predicted, a proliferation of technologies and abilities, and geopolitical tensions. Given current conditions, we do not see a particularly bright future if our current cybersecurity strategy remains more or less constant.

What is our current strategy? In short, it is the accumulation of a lot of expensive toys to hold together decaying infrastructure, along with a healthy dose of the putting aside or worse, ignoring, the basics. In short, we look to more technological solutions, but we avoid the single greatest problem: our decisions. The growing track record of failures demonstrates that this “technology-heavy” approach is not working.

The underlying problem with this strategy is that it is simply untenable unless there is some revolutionary technology that completely changes the landscape. And while we do think artificial intelligence and quantum computing will be game-changing, we do not necessarily believe they will solve all our problems. Poor handling and implementation of these two technologies may, in fact, accelerate our demise. Therefore, we cannot continue to throw what limited resources we have at supposed technological wizardry, fixes, and repairs when the root of our deepest problems are inherently insecure systems, poor maintenance, and social engineering. Continue reading “A National Cybersecurity Action Plan is a Serious Priority”